ONE, TWO, THREE (Broken Dreams: Natalya’s story)

ONE, TWO, THREE (Broken Dreams: Natalya’s story)

Available as ebook as well as paperback and audiobook. Links to stores and digital libraries below.

When seventeen-year-old Natalya’s dreams of being a ballerina are killed in a car accident along with her father, she must choose: shut down, like her mother, or open up to love.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is available_at_amazon_en_vertical_wht.pngThis image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is audible_logo_bw_ko.pngThis image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is overdrive_logo_1866x271_w.png
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is apple-1.pngThis image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is kobo-1.pngThis image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is googleplay-1.pngThis image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is hoopla.png

More ordering options below – including library options and audible free trial! As well as full summary and an excerpt

When seventeen-year-old Natalya’s dreams of being a ballerina are killed in a car accident along with her father, she must choose: shut down, like her mother, or open up to love.

Last year, seventeen-year-old Natalya Pushkaya was attending the School of Performing Arts in New York City. Last year, she was well on her way to becoming a professional ballerina. Last year, her father was still alive.

But a car crash changed all that—and Natalya can’t stop blaming herself. Now, she goes to a regular high school in New Jersey; lives with her onetime prima ballerina, now alcoholic mother; and has no hope of a dance career.

At her new school, however, sexy soccer player Antonio sees a brighter future for Natalya, or at least a more pleasant present. Keeping him an arabesque away proves to be a challenge for Natalya and his patient charms eventually draw her out of her shell. When upsetting secrets come to light and Tonio’s own problems draw her in, Natalya shuts down again, this time turning to alcohol herself.

Can Natalya learn to trust Antonio before she loses him—and destroys herself?

AVAILABLE AS EBOOK… 

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is available-at-amazon-3.pngThis image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is apple-1.pngThis image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is kobo-1.pngThis image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is googleplay-1.png
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is scribd-2.jpgThis image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is indigo-1.jpgThis image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is nook-1.pngThis image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is 24s-1.png
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is angus.pngThis image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is overdrive.pngThis image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is hoopla.png

AVAILABLE AS PAPERBACK

AVAILABLE AS AUDIOBOOK

START YOUR FREE TRIAL OF AUDIBLE…

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is available-at-amazon-4.pngThis image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is audible_logo_2c_rgb-1.pngThis image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is apple-1.png

1.

Chopin’s music is the soundtrack of my life.

Papa played his most heart-wrenching waltzes, Mama used his nocturnes as lullabies when I was little, and my legs itched to form an arabesque whenever I heard Polonaises op. 40. Chopin used to be my escape, a way to dream about the future, about everything I wanted—from finally not being scared of falling in love to dancing the role of Cinderella one day at the Bolshoi Theater in Moscow.

But that was before.

The somber melody of Chopin’s Prelude op. 28 oppresses me. That piece is also called “Suffocation.” How fitting. Mama listens to it on repeat. She’s slumped at the living room table in the far corner. Only one of the lights is working and the darkness almost settles around her as she pours herself one shot of vodka after the other.

“Mama, you need to go to sleep,” I tell her for the fifth time. She’s downing the bottle as if there’s no tomorrow, and maybe that’s what she’s hoping for. Her head wobbles from one side to another. She’s already far gone. I missed my doctor’s appointment today because she was too drunk to drive me. I had to lie for her again. Dr. Gibson bought it, and we rescheduled for two weeks. He agreed that as long as I followed his advice (wearing my knee brace, doing my strength exercises, and no jumps) I could volunteer at the community center to help little kids learn to dance. He even gave my name to the volunteer coordinator there. She was looking for a college student, but I convinced her during the interview that even though I was only seventeen, she should still give me a chance. If I do well with the kids this Saturday, I’ll get to help out every weekend for a few hours.

Mama stands up, swaying around with the bottle in her hand.

“I need you out of my face,” she slurs and pushes me away. I wouldn’t have stumbled before. After all, balance is everything for a ballerina, but my knee brace makes my movements awkward. I stumble into the bookshelves holding my babushka’s favorite novels from Tolstoy and Shakespeare: she loved Anna Karenina and Romeo and Juliet. She always laughed about a pamphlet Tolstoy wrote that criticized Shakespeare, and she could talk for hours about literature. If my babushka were here, maybe she’d be able to get through to Mama. But at the same time, I’m relieved she didn’t see how her family crumbled to pieces after the accident.

“It was my fault!” Mama’s words cut through my heart, knowing I can’t seem to convince her otherwise. “It was my fault,” she whispers. “I killed him!” Her voice goes crescendo. “I don’t want to see you! Get out!”

My stomach clenches. No matter how many times she pushes me away, I still have the same reaction: I want to comfort her, to remind her she’s not responsible.

I am.

GRAB YOUR COPY NOW…