Don´t be scared…

That would be me hiding away on Friday after posting my draft query to be reviewed. I thought “hmm sounds good…let’s get this baby rolling”…After receiving some very constructive feedback, I realized “hmmm that sucked

The wonderful thing about feedback is that it helps to make us better and stronger. Plus, I realized there was something positive in my very crappy-I´m-even-wondering-if-I-should-not-delete-the-message-on-forum-first-query (somebody liked my voice in that mess :-))

I also appreciated something else which for somebody a tad perfectionist can be difficult: I will not be perfect at my first-go. This will take time and it’s ok. I am swimming in unknown waters. Finishing the first draft is just the first step in a looong process. On a brighter note, I started editing and even though it is kicking my butt, I can see my story getting to a better place 🙂

Now, tell me 🙂

What do you do when you just want to put your paws (huh I mean hands) in front of your face?

20 Comments

  1. Robin says:

    I definitely put my paws to my face, as you say, but more when I don’t understand what’s not working. I then sometimes turn to chocolate, and might need to walk away from my desk for a little while. Once I have an idea of how to change it, I get re-energized again.

    It took me quite awhile to polish my query, and I found that a writer’s workshop on queries helped me a lot. Good luck with yours!

  2. moosenoose says:

    Erm I hide and stuff my face with chocolate! I have a day off where I try to do something different and not think about it. Then I get back to it. Chocolate always helps me focus!

  3. Colin Smith says:

    One of the best things that happened to my query was the Query Forum at last August’s WriteOnCon online conference. Not only did other writers pick my query apart and tell me what was working (and what wasn’t), but I even got feedback from a “Ninja Agent” (i.e., one of a group of unnamed literary agents that dropped in on the forums and randomly picked posts to critique).

    The purpose of the query is to get the agent to read your work, so feedback from others is essential. If your critique friends tell you “sorry, this doesn’t entice me,” then it’s probable agents will feel the same way.

    Keep at it, Elodie! You’ll get there. 🙂

    • Elodie says:

      Thanks Colin 😀
      Great on getting yours critiqued by a “Ninja agent” and once I get this baby polished, I’lll be looking forward to all the feedback I can get…:-)

  4. katyupperman says:

    I think we must be a lot alike. I always strive for perfection my first go-round too, and then I’m shocked when I get LOTS of feedback to the contrary. The writing community is so helpful and awesome, though. We’re lucky to be able to get so much critique before we put our work out there for real. Way to be brave, lady! 🙂

    • Elodie says:

      Thanks Katy! 🙂
      It does sound like we’re alike on this right-from-the-start perfection quest…In that sense writing is a very humbling experience! The writing community is great and I am also very thankful for them 😀

  5. Kitty says:

    That picture actually made me say “Awww” out loud … and I’m not a sappy person! I’m with moosenoose – chocolate is the answer. To almost every problem! Keep plugging away, Elodie! It’s all worth it. 🙂

  6. Realizing that we won’t be perfect the first time around is such a hard thing to overcome. I really had to psych myself up for sucking when I wrote the first draft of my WIP because I so wanted it to be so awesome it didn’t even need a line edit. Yeah. Right.

    At least critiques make the work stronger. Oh, and as far as queries go, mine hasn’t been critiqued much, but I found that the most helpful query tips come from author Elana Johnson’s free e-book: http://www.elanajohnson.com/#!query-to-the-call

    • Elodie says:

      Thanks for the link Tracey and for the reminder that practice/feedback makes us/our work stronger and better and more beautiful 🙂
      It’s a learning process and I’m getting there one step at a time…

  7. What I do is remember the countless true stories of authors who were once at that very point you are talking about. A few examples: Kathyrn Sockett’s “The Help” was turned down 60 times! Doctor Seuss first book was turned down 28 times! John Grisham went through rejections from 16 agencies and more than 30 publishers before he got his first book published! He took many books from that first printing and sold them himself. Remember…What makes them any different then you? Nothing, if you keep trying! Took me years to write my first book and I am currently working on my second. If I had quit, I wouldn’t have become an Award-Winning Author. =) I am a writer/story teller and I will be the first to admit not a grammarian that is what editors are for.

    • Elodie says:

      Thanks Crystal for taking the time to comment and for giving me renewed strength 🙂
      The writing community is really wonderful at keeping its members above the water and giving them support or a kick in the butt when needed 😀
      And by the way, I just went on your website: I love it! (and congrats on becoming an Award-Winning Author :-))

Comments put a smile on my face :-)

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: